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Pre Arrival:  Overview | Charts | Docs
Arrival:  Approach | Pilots
Communications:  Pratique | Pre-Arrival | VHF | VTS/Radar
Pollution:  Ballast | Pollution
Local Info:  Holidays | Weather
Shore:  Consuls | Customs
Misc:  Authority
Report:  Report
General Information for Canada
Geo-political:
Capital City: Ottawa.
Nationality: (noun) Canadian, (adjective) Canadian.
Population: 33,487,208.
Communications:
International Direct Dial Code: 1.
Number of Internal Airports: 515.
Major Languages Spoken: English (official) 58.8%, French (official) 21.6%, other 19.6% (2006 Census).
Economy:
Currency: 1 Canadian Dollar (CAD) of 100 Cents.
Main Industries: Transportation equipment, chemicals, processed and unprocessed minerals, food products, wood and paper products, fish products and petroleum and natural gas.
Environment:
Territorial Sea: 12 n.m.
Other Maritime Claims: Contiguous Zone: 24 n.m. Continental Shelf: 200 n.m. or to the edge of the continental margin. Exclusive Economic Zone: 200 n.m.
Coastline Extent: 202,080 km.
Climate: Varies from temperate in south to subarctic and arctic in north.
Natural Resources: Iron ore, nickel, zinc, copper, gold, lead, molybdenum, potash, diamonds, silver, fish, timber, wildlife, coal, petroleum, natural gas and hydropower.
Natural Hazards: Continuous permafrost in north is a serious obstacle to development; cyclonic storms form east of the Rocky Mountains, a result of the mixing of air masses from the Arctic, Pacific, and North American interior, and produce most of the country's rain and snow east of the mountains.
Terrain: Mostly plains with mountains in west and lowlands in southeast.
Average Temperatures: 
Month High Low
January -8° C -15° C
June 24° C 12° C
September 19° C 10° C
OVERVIEW:  Canada has over 550 port facilities. Parliament enacted the Canada Marine Act (CMA), which created 18 Canada Port Authorities and designated several other ports as public ports.
Canada Port Authorities are federally incorporated, autonomous, non-share corporations that operate at arm’s length from the federal government. They operate on a commercial basis with a view to being financially self-sufficient. They also fulfil important public policy objectives (supporting economic development) and regulatory requirements (safety, security, and environmental protection). The five largest Canada Port Authorities are Vancouver, Montreal, Prince Rupert, Halifax and Saint John.
Canada’s public ports have a regional orientation. They may be owned by Transport Canada or by non-federal entities (e.g., private entities, provinces or municipalities, or a not-for-profit entity). The biggest Transport Canada-owned public ports are Baie-Comeau, Gaspe, Rimouski, Matane, and Gros-Cacouna, all located in Quebec.
There are also a number of non-federal ports in Canada. Transport Canada’s role is limited to a regulatory and compliance monitoring role (e.g., Canada Environmental Assessment Act, 2012; Navigable Waters and Protection Act).
CHARTS:  Nautical charts and publications published by Fisheries & Oceans Canada (Transport Canada). Chart catalogue and online publications and Notices to Mariners available at
DOCUMENTS:  Foreign nationals arriving in Canada as crew members of a vessel who hold a seafarer's identity document issued under International Labour Organisation conventions do not require a passport. They do require a passport (and appropriate visa), however, if travelling to Canada by air or by other means for the purpose of becoming a member of the crew of a vessel which is already in Canada.
APPROACHES:  Navigational Warnings (NAVWARNs) replace Notices to Shipping (NOTSHIPs) and shall be construed as Notices to Shipping.
Ice Navigation in Canadian Waters:  Ice Navigation in Canadian Waters is published by the Canadian Coast Guard in collaboration with Transport Canada Marine Safety, the Canadian Ice Service of Environment Canada and the Canadian Hydrographic Service of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. The publication is intended to assist ships operating in ice in all Canadian waters, including the Arctic.
There is a variety of icebreaking and support services available to ships transiting Canadian ice-covered waters. Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) Ice Operations Centres are in operation seasonally as ice conditions dictate. These Centres work in conjunction with Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS) Centres to provide up-to-date ice information, to suggest routes for ships to follow through or around ice, and to co-ordinate icebreaker assistance to shipping. Ice Navigation in Canadian Waters is available to view online and to download at:
Northern Right Whales:  In 2019, Transport Canada will be using two measures to protect right whales in the Gulf of St Lawrence:
  1. fixed speed restriction in a large area from 28 April to 15 November 2019 where vessels with LOA 20 m. and above are restricted to max. speed of 10 knots; all other vessels are encouraged to respect this limit
  2. temporary speed restrictions in designated shipping lanes when a right whale is spotted in or near the lane.
For navigational warnings currently in force, visit the Canadian Coast Guard website nis.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/public/rest/messages/en/search
Also see VTS/Radar
PILOTAGE:  Marine pilotage services in Eastern Canada are provided by the Atlantic, Laurentian and Great Lakes Pilotage Authorities, and in Western Canada by the Pacific Authority.
Pilotage Authorities:  Atlantic Pilotage Authority, 200 Barrington Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3J 3K1, Canada. T: +1 (902) 426 2550. F: +1 (902) 426 4004. dispatch@atlanticpilotage.com www.atlanticpilotage.com/
Laurentian Pilotage Authority, 555 Rene Levesque Blvd. West, Room 1501, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2Z 1B1. T: +1 (514) 283 6320. F: +1 (514) 496 2409. administration@apl.gc.ca www.pilotagestlaurent.gc.ca/
Great Lakes Pilotage Authority Ltd, PO Box 95, Cornwall, Ontario, Canada K6H 5R9. T: +1 (613) 933 2991. F: +1 (613) 932 3793. glpa@cnwl.igs.net www.glpa-apgl.com/
Pacific Pilotage Authority, 1000-1130 West Pender Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6E 4A4. T: +1 (604) 666 6771. F: +1 (604) 666 1647. info@ppa.gc.ca www.ppa.gc.ca/
General information on pilotage services, including required notifications, pilot boarding stations and radio frequencies is contained in the Annual Edition of the Canadian Notices to Mariners (No. 23 of 1993).
Pacific Pilotage Authority Region:  The Pacific Pilotage Authority dispatches pilots in all of British Columbia. Any vessel over 350 g.t. is subject to compulsory pilotage, unless exempt or pilotage waived by the Authority. Contact Vancouver Dispatch T: +1 (604) 666 6776, 800 663 0407, and VHF Channel 17. Victoria Dispatch T: +1 (250) 363 3878, 800 523 8709, and VHF Channel 17.
The Master, owner or Agent of a ship that requires the services of a licensed pilot shall notify the PPA of ETA of the vessel at the pilot boarding station:
  1. Victoria – at least 12 hurs before arrival with confirmed or corrected ETA 4 hours before arrival
  2. Triple Island, Pine Island, Cape Beale or Sandlands – at least 48 hours before arrival with confirmed or corrected ETA at least 12 hours before arrival.
Atlantic Pilotage Authority Region:  This region includes all Canadian waters in and around the provinces of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, including the waters of Chaleur Bay in Quebec Province, south of Cap d'Espoir. Requests for pilots for the Atlantic Pilotage Region are received by Central Dispatch, located in Halifax. Dispatchers operate throughout 24 hours.
Requests for pilots must be sent 12 hours before arrival and confirmed or amended between 6 and 2 hours (depending on the port) before arrival at pilot boarding area. ETA times must be given in UTC.
Full details of the notice required at the various pilotage areas are given in Canadian Annual Notice to Mariners No. 23.
Compulsory Pilotage Areas: There are 16 compulsory pilotage areas and in excess of 20 non-compulsory pilotage areasNew Brunswick - Saint John, Miramichi, RestigoucheNewfoundland - Bay of Exploits, Holyrood, Placentia Bay, Stephenville, Humber Arm, St. John'sNova Scotia - Bras d'Or Lakes, Halifax, Pugwash, Strait of Canso, SydneyPrince Edward Island - Charlottetown, Confederation Bridge.
    There are 16 compulsory pilotage areas and in excess of 20 non-compulsory pilotage areas: 
  1. New Brunswick - Saint John, Miramichi, Restigouche
  2. Newfoundland - Bay of Exploits, Holyrood, Placentia Bay, Stephenville, Humber Arm, St. John's
  3. Nova Scotia - Bras d'Or Lakes, Halifax, Pugwash, Strait of Canso, Sydney
  4. Prince Edward Island - Charlottetown, Confederation Bridge.
PRATIQUE:  Asian Gypsy Moth Inspection:  Full enforcement of the certification and entry requirements for marine vessels arriving from the regulated areas below is in force as follows:
All marine vessels arriving in Western Canadian ports from 1 March to 15 September, and in Eastern Canadian ports, including inland ports, from 15 March to 15 September, and which have visited ports during specified periods of risk for Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) during the current year or preceding year, that are located in the Russian Far East, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and all ports north of Shanghai (defined as all ports on or north of 31° 15′ N) in the People's Republic of China must provide the following to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA):
  1. 96-hour notice of arrival
  2. list of previous ports of call over the last two years
  3. valid Phytosanitary Certificate or other approved certificate issued by an authority recognised by the CFIA 9 Canadian Food Inspection Agency) as per Appendix 4 of D-95-03: Plant protection policy for marine vessels arriving in Canada from areas regulated for Asian Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar, Lymantria albescens, Lymantria postalba, Lymantria umbrosa).
West Coast: Please provide the above information and documents by: cfia.bcagm-sacb.acia@canada.ca or F: +1 (604) 666 1156.
East Coast: Please provide the above information and documents by: cfia.agm-sa.acia@canada.ca or F: +1 (902) 426 5147.
The certificate must state that the vessel was inspected and found free from AGM (Asian Gypsy Moth) from at least the last port of call in a regulated area during the specified risk period. A vessel without the required certification may not be permitted entry into Canada. CFIA (Canadian Food Inspection Agency) may conduct inspections at designated offshore inspection sites as an alternative to refusing entry. A vessel calling on a Canadian port for a second time without the required certification may be refused entry to Canada. All costs linked to the disruption of loading/unloading schedules and commitments are the responsibility of the vessel's owner. The vessel may be subject to additional enforcement action.
Full enforcement of the certification and entry requirements for marine vessels arriving from the expanded regulated are began 1 March 2012. Certificates must be obtained if you visit a regulated area of Russia, Japan, the People's Republic of China and the Republic of Korea within the specified period listed in the table below. The specified period is when the AGM (Asian Gypsy Moth) female is flying and laying eggs. These specified periods vary within the regulated areas and are as follows:
Country Port or Prefecture Specified Period
Russian Far East Nakhodka, Ol'ga, Plastun, Pos'yet, Russkiy Island, Slavyanka, Vanino, Vladivostock, Vostochny, Zarubino, Kozimo 1 July–30 Sept
People's Republic of China All ports in northern China, including all ports north of Shanghai, on or north of 31° 15′ N 1 June–30 Sept
Republic of Korea All ports 1 June–30 Sept
Japan - Northern Hokkaido, Aomori, Iwate, Miyagi, Fukushima 1 July–30 Sept
Japan - Western Akita, Yamagata, Niigata, Toyama, Ishikawa 25 June–15 Sept
Japan - Eastern Fukui, Ibaraki, Chiba, Tokyo, Kanagawa, Shizuoka, Aichi, Mie 20 June–20 August
Japan - Southern Wakayama, Osaka, Kyoto, Hyogo, Tottori, Shimane, Okayama, Hiroshima, Yamaguchi, Kagawa, Tokushima, Ehime, Kochi, Fukuoka, Oita, Saga, Nagasaki, Miyazaki, Kumamoto, Kagoshima 1 June–10 August
Japan - Far Southern Okinawa 25 May–30 June
To protect Canadian forests, the CFIA is committed to preventing the introduction of Asian Gypsy Moth from foreign ports and to ensure that all incoming vessels from regulated ports have been inspected and certified free from the pest by a recognised authority. Marine vessels entering Canada without approved certification will by non-compliant and subject to regulatory action. More information on penalties associated with Asian Gypsy Moth regulation can be obtained from your Canadian ship agent. For information on obtaining approved certification in ports located in the regulated areas, please contact your agents in Russia, Japan, China and Korea.
Further information can also be obtained from Memorandum D-95-03: Plant protection policy for marine vessels arriving in Canada from areas regulated for Asian Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar, Lymantria albescens, Lymantri postalba, Lymantri umbrosa).
PRE-ARRIVAL INFORMATION:  There are commercial reporting requirements for the movement and control of unreleased goods in Canada by carriers, freight forwarders and warehouse operators. Using information collected from Advance Commercial Information (ACI) and eManifest, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) detects risks and makes decisions before shipments arrive at the border and/or are released into Canada. Carriers and freight forwarders must have a CBSA issued carrier code. Consult the Commercial Carrier and Freight Forwarder Identification and Eligibility for more information. www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/services/carrier-transporteur/menu-eng.html
Carrier code holders must immediately advise the CBSA of any change to their legal entity, name, address and contact information.
Marine carriers transporting goods into Canada must transmit marine cargo and conveyance data to the CBSA within prescribed time frames prior to arrival or prior to loading (depending on the type and origin of goods). Refer to Memorandum D3-5-1, Marine Pre-load/Pre-arrival and Reporting Requirements to verify the specific time frames. cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/dm-md/d3/d3-5-1-eng.html
Pre-Arrival Notification (PAN):  Advance Commercial Information (ACI) does not change the Pre-Arrival Notification (PAN) process. Arrangements to clear a vessel in international commercial service can be made with the local CBSA office and with the submission of a completed BSF732, National Targeting Centre – Pre-arrival Notice, to the National Targeting Centre via email, either by the ship's Agent or Master 96 hours prior to arrival of the vessel. The complete inward report package — form E1, Ships Stores Declaration; Crew List (FAL Form 5) and Passenger List (FAL Form 6), if applicable, the form BSF552, Crew’s Effects Declaration - must be presented to the CBSA prior to any persons being allowed to disembark or embark the vessel, or any cargo being discharged.
The Pre-arrival Notice must be submitted 96 hours prior to arrival with Crew List and Passenger List. Completed forms shall be submitted by fax or email to F: +1 (613) 960 1556. cbsa-asfc-pans-apa@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca
Copies of Pre-Arrival Notice can be obtained from the Canada Border Agency Service website at cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/forms-formulaires/bsf732.pdf
Pre-Arrival Information Report:  Vessel shall complete a Pre-Arrival Information Report (PAIR) form and send it to Transport Canada Marine Safety and Security:
  1. if the duration of the segment of the voyage before entering Canadian waters is less than 24 hours, as soon as practicable before entering Canadian waters but no later than the time of departure from the last port of call
  2. if the duration of the segment of the voyage before entering Canadian waters is less than 96 hours but more than 24 hours, at least 24 hours before entering Canadian waters
  3. at least 96 hours prior to entering Canadian waters.
The PAIR can be sent electronically via email to one of the addresses specified below, and the email shall include vessel’s name and IMO number in the subject line and a copy of vessel’s ISSC included.
  1. Vessels entering western Canada to contact Transport Canada Marine Safety and Security (West Coast). T: +1 (250) 363 4850. marsecw@tc.gc.ca
  2. Vessels entering eastern Canada, the Saint Lawrence Seaway or the Canadian Arctic to contact Transport Canada Marine Safety and Security (East Coast). T: +1 (902) 427 8003. marsece@tc.gc.ca
Vessel's Clearance Requirements:  Masters of all vessels in international commercial service arriving in Canada must proceed without delay directly to a CBSA office designated for the clearance of vessels. The complete inward report package includes: E1, Ship's Stores Declaration; Crew List (FAL Form 5); BSF552, Crew Effects Declaration. The package must be presented to the CBSA before any persons being allowed to disembark or embark the vessel, or any cargo being discharged.
For vessels exempted from the Advance Commercial Information (ACI) program, a paper A6 - General Declaration must be submitted to the CBSA.
All copies of the Form A6 will be date-stamped and signed by a Border Services Officer. The presence of the CBSA signature and date-stamp signifies acceptance of the inward report and is not to be considered a validation of all information of the form. A copy must be kept by the carrier as proof of report.
Cargo may only be discharged with CBSA permission as signified by the presence of a Border Services Officer's signature and date-stamp on the Form A6.
After the Form A6 is numbered (when required), date-stamped and signed by a Border Services Officer, the copies will be distributed as follows:
  1. one copy with attachments retained by the CBSA
  2. one copy with attachments to Statistics Canada
  3. one copy faxed back to the vessel or to the Agent for presentation to the Harbour Master.
Normally, arrangements to clear a vessel in international commercial service can be made with the local CBSA office in advance, either by Agent or Master.
Anchoring on Arrival:  If a vessel that arrives from a foreign port requires anchoring in the harbour or stream, due to exceptional circumstances, a Border Services Officer may proceed on board to accept the Ship's Stores Declaration, Crew Effects Declaration, and seal ship's stores only if all health and safety requirements are met, and local management deems that it is safe to do so. Masters or Agents are to be advised that the boarding of the vessel for this purpose is simply a preliminary function carried out to enable the vessel to proceed with local port routine without undue delay, and is not to be considered a substitute for formal reporting or CBSA clearance procedures. When practicable, the formal inward report may be taken at this time; should the vessel arrive after hours, the Master or Agent may present the inward report the following day.
Canal System Transit:  Vessels moving through locks in a canal system will not be boarded or disembarked from by a Border Services Officer unless fully stopped, anchored or secured to the canal wall. Under no circumstances will an officer board such a vessel other than by way of a properly secured gangway/accommodation ladder. Similarly, vessels in stream will not be boarded or disembarked from unless stopped and anchored. Rope ladders that are completely secured will only be used when no other practical alternative exists.
Quarantine on Arrival:  Where a vessel arrives in Canada flying a yellow quarantine flag (infectious disease), the Border Services Officer will not conduct normal clearance procedures until advised by the appropriate health authority that it is safe to do so. Pending such notification, the Border Services Officer, with the help of the local police authority or the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), as judged appropriate, will endeavour to ensure that the vessel is maintained in a sterile condition pending cancellation of the health alert by the competent health authority. For more information please refer to the Quarantine Act.
In the event that the CBSA is advised of a death or serious injury on board a vessel arriving in Canada, the Border Services Officer will promptly advise the appropriate police and health authorities, will authorise their embarkation on board the vessel at the earliest possible moment and will endeavour to assist them in carrying out an investigation of the incident and assist them in removing any injured or deceased persons. The Border Services Officer will remain responsible for maintaining control over the situation and ensuring that CBSA requirements are completed even if delayed.
Certificate Inspection:  On occasion, Border Services officers will board the vessel to ensure that it is in compliance with the registration, safety compliance, and crew certification provisions of the Canada Shipping Act . This will include verifying that the following documents are present and valid:
  1. Certificate of Registry
  2. Passenger Ship Safety Certificate
  3. Cargo Ship Safety Certificate (500 tons or more)
  4. Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate
  5. Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate
  6. International Load Line Certificate
  7. officers' Certificates of Competency; and/or
  8. Certificate of insurance or other financial security.
Where it is determined that a certificate is not present, is invalid, or is likely to expire before the anticipated departure date, the Master will be informed of this fact as well as the nearest ships safety office. Appropriate operational steps will be taken to ensure that the vessel is not granted an outward clearance until such time as a valid certificate is presented.
At this time (until such a time that a valid certificate is presented), the CBSA performs the functions of the shipping Master at those locations where it is empowered to do so.
A full copy of Memorandum D3-5-1, Marine Pre-load/Pre-arrival and Reporting Requirements available at www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/dm-md/d3-eng.html
Processing of Cruise Ships:  Reference should be made to the CBSA publication CBSA Cruise Ship Handbook, available on request from cruise-croisiere@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca Voluntary compliance with Before Arrival Information – Cruise Ship Travellers will assist in the expeditious processing of crew and passengers. This includes the following passenger information:
  1. surname, first name and initial(s) of any middle names
  2. date of birth
  3. gender
  4. name of the country that issued the passport or travel document or, if the person does not have a passport or travel document, the person's citizenship or nationality
  5. passport or travel document number.
In addition, the CBSA may request the following information:
  1. the passenger's city of origin
  2. the final destination for CBSA clearance
  3. whether the person is travelling in-transit through Canada.
Until an automated system is in place for the marine mode, it is essential that the Before Arrival Information – Cruise Ship Travellers be provided as far in advance as possible of the cruise ship's arrival to facilitate the movement of passengers and crew and their goods. Before Arrival Information – Cruise Ship Travellers should be provided a minimum of seven days in advance. An update/confirmed manifest must be provided as soon as the cruise ship departs the last foreign port before arriving in Canada.
Cruise Ship Pre-Arrival Notice:  A complete, accurate and legible pre-arrival notice must be submitted to the CBSA a minimum of 96 hours before the cruise ship's arrival. This notice should be sent securely, either electronically or by fax, to the nearest available CBSA office that will provide clearance to the cruise ship.
In situations where a voyage is less than 96 hours in duration, the notice must be submitted at the time of departure from the last foreign port. Form BSF136, Cruise Ship Pre-Arrival Notice, must be forwarded securely to the CBSA electronically or by fax. Form BSF136 is available on the CBSA's website.
Form BSF136 should include the following information:
  1. name and call sign of the cruise ship
  2. name of the Agent representing the cruise ship
  3. total number of passengers and crew
  4. total number of repatriating crew
  5. date and time of arrival and departure
  6. expiry dates of the ship's certificates
  7. any additional port-specific information required to facilitate clearance.
Remote Areas:  In the case of remote areas, Form BSF136 must be submitted 10 business days before the cruise ship arrives at the regional CBSA office of arrival. This time is required to allow the CBSA sufficient time to make the necessary operational arrangements to provide CBSA clearance at a remote location (eg. scheduling border services officers to travel to the remote location).
Cruise Ships Transporting Commercial Cargo:  A conveyance report as well as cargo reports must be submitted for cruise ships transporting commercial cargo in accordance with Advance Commercial Information (ACI) regulations. Commercial cargo on cruise ships is not excluded from the requirement of ACI. Form A6, General Declaration, must be completed, The cargo must be reported to the CBSA, within the prescribed time frame, on Form A6A, Freight/Cargo Manifest. Form A6A is available on the CBSA's website.
For more information on transporting commercial cargo, refer to memoranda D4-2-1, Ship's Stores, D3-5-1, Marine Pre-load/Pre-arrival and Reporting Requirements and D3-1-5, International Commercial Transportation.
Inward Report:  Although the Master of the vessel is responsible for the inward report of the vessel, it is acceptable for the ship's purser or other designated ship's officer to meet the CBSA upon arrival to facilitate the clearance process. The CBSA should be provided with the names of the Master, the officer-in-charge of passenger clearance and the officer in charge of crew clearance.
Form A6 must be presented to the CBSA at the time of inward report. At the start of the cruise ship season, the complete vessel itinerary should be attached to Form A6. The itinerary will consist of the vessel's destinations, including arrival and departure information. Form A6 is available on the CBSA's website.
Note:  Form A6 inward is to be stamped during the processing of a cruise ship that is fully cleared at the first port of entry, whether as a small cruise ship (250 passengers and crew or less) or as a large cruise ship that is fully cleared at a CSO or under cost recovery.
At all subsequent ports of call, including the final port before the vessel exits Canada, a fax of Form A6 inwards and outwards is acceptable. For cruise ships that are fully cleared, and the port of exit is in a remote location in Canada, a fax of Form A6 must be sent to the closest CBSA district office where the cruise ship is exiting Canada.
Outward Report:  All cruise ships outbound from Canada must file the following documentation at the last Canadian port:
  1. a complete Crew List
  2. an outward report on Form A6
  3. safety and crew certificates (upon request)
  4. Port Warden certificates (upon request)
Note:  Port Warden certificates prove that the ship complies with regulations pertaining to the distribution, content, stowage and securing of cargo; the soundness of the vessel; the stability load line requirements of a specified voyage; and the proper loading of the vessel. In accordance with paragraph 56 of Memorandum D3-5-1, Port Warden certificates are not normally examined by the CBSA before departure; however, where the CBSA is advised that such a certificate has not been issued or that any duty, fee or penalty payable to the Crown or any agency of the Crown has not been paid, permission to sail will be withheld until the situation is corrected.
When a border services officer believes that not all non-resident crew members are on board a vessel at the time that outward clearance is requested, a crew muster may be conducted.
    A delay in sailing will not necessitate the preparation of a new outward report (Form A6) unless one of the following circumstance applies: 
  1. bonded stores are laden on board after the CBSA's clearance
  2. crew changes have occurred, or
  3. delays are unusually long (eg. mechanical difficulties or bad weather).
For more information on the A6 outward report, refer to Memorandum D3-1-8  (Cargo – Export Movements).
Vessel and Passenger Arrival Requirements:  Border services officers will board the vessel upon arrival to ensure that the following documentation is submitted.
  1. Form A6, General Declaration
  2. Form E1, Ship's Stores Declaration
  3. Last port clearance
  4. Goods to be landed list
  5. Passenger List
  6. Form E63-1, Cruise Vessel/Passenger and Crew Arrival
  7. Crew List (repatriating - with reasons for leaving)
  8. Crew List (joining vessel)
  9. Crew Effects Declaration (Form BSF552)
  10. any letter of special permission or documentation concerning port-specific requirements
  11. Stowaways List (where required)
  12. Form IMM 0202, Notice of Deserter/Inadmissible Crew Member (where required).
A full copy of Memorandum D2-3-7,  Marine Operations – Canada Border Services Agency; Processing of Cruise Ships available at www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/
VHF:  Vessels on an inbound voyage to a Canadian port shall be fitted with VHF radio capable of communication on Channel 5A, in accordanace with USA regulations US CFR Code (CFR 33 161.12 Table C).
VTS/RADAR:  Three offshore VTS systems are in operation in Canada. The Eastern Canada VTS, known as ECAREG CANADA, the Northern Canada VTS, known as NORDREG CANADA, and the Western Canada VTS, known as VTS Offshore, are mandatory vessel traffic services. These systems also provide the mariner with information pertaining to ice conditions, vessel routing, icebreaker assistance and other Coast Guard services. Vessels may contact ECAREG, NORDREG or VTS Offshore via the nearest MCTS Centre or refer to the latest edition of the annual publication Radio Aids to Marine Navigation.
Full details of VTS systems in operation in Canada are available at www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/Marine-Communications/RAMN-2018/Part3#tab31
ECAREG:  With respect to the Eastern Canada VTS zone, contact must be made with EGAREG 96 hours before entering Canadian waters, to meet Transport Canada Marine Security requirements, providing a Pre-Arrival Information Report. Further contact shall be made with ECAREG CANADA 24 hours before entering Canadian waters to obtain a clearance. The Eastern Canada Vessel Traffic Services Zone Regulations apply in respect of:
a) every ship of 500 g.t. or more
b) every ship that is engaged in towing or pushing a vessel, where the combined tonnage of the ship and the vessel being towed or pushed is 500 g.t. or more;
or
c) every ship carrying a pollutant or dangerous goods, or engaged in towing or pushing a vessel carrying a pollutant or dangerous goods as prescribed in the;
i. International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code, and
ii. Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations.
Participation is mandatory.
ECAREG zone reports shall be communicated directly to ECAREG or to the nearest CCG MCTS Centre. All times given in ECAREG zone reports shall be Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).
Dependent upon the reporting requirement, various elements of the following may be required to be reported:
a) ship name
b) call sign
c) name of Master
d) position
e) time (UTC) arrived at the position
f) course, if any
g) speed, if any
h) prevailing weather conditions (including ice if applicable)
I) ETA (UTC) that the ship will enter the Eastern Canada VTS Zone
j) ETD the ship will depart the berth
k) destination
l) ETA (UTC) at destination
m) route the ship intends to take through the Eastern Canada VTS zone
n) last port of call
o) draft
p) any dangerous goods, listed by class, or pollutant, that is carried on board the ship or a vessel being towed or pushed by the ship
q) N/A
r) any defect in the ship's hull, main propulsion systems or steering systems, radars, compasses, radio equipment, anchors or cables
s) any discharge, or threat of discharge, of a pollutant from the ship into the water, and any damage to the ship that may result in the discharge of a pollutant from the ship into the water
t) name of Canadian or United States agent of the ship
u) the date of expiration of the following certificate:
i. Certificate of Insurance or Other Financial Security in Respect of Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage
ii. International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate
iii. International Pollution Prevention Certificate for the Carriage of Noxious Liquid Substances in Bulk
iv. Certificate of Fitness and the Certificate of Compliance, if any issued to the ship.
The following is also requested:
  1. date and expiration of the ISM Safety Management Certificate
  2. ISM document of compliance
  3. Certificate of Insurance or Other Financial Security in Respect of Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage.
Prior to entering the zone, a report containing all the required information listed, except item j), shall be made 24 hours prior to entering the zone, or as soon as practical where the ETA of the ship at the zone is less than 24 hours after the time the ship departed for the last port of call. This report is not required where:
  1. the ship is on a voyage between two ports within the zone; and
  2. the ship is entering the zone directly from the Northern Canada Vessel Traffic Service zone, and is in possession of a valid NORDREG Clearance.
Immediately before the ship crosses the zone boundary when entering the zone, a report containing the required information listed in a), b), d), h) and I) shall be made. This report is not required when entering directly from a local VTS zone.
On arrival at berth, a report containing the required information listed in a) and b), as well as the following information, shall be made:
  1. port of arrival
  2. time of arrival.
When departing berth, a report containing the required information, except item a), shall be made two hours before a ship departs a berth. A traffic clearance to depart a berth is valid for one hour from the estimated time of departure. Where a traffic clearance to depart berth has expired because of a revised time of departure, a new traffic clearance is required. In this case, the report need only contain the ship's name, call-sign, position and revised time of departure. This report is not required where the ship is proceeding to another berth in the same port.
When exiting the zone, a report containing the required information listed in a), b), d) and h), shall be made immediately before the ship crosses the seaward boundary.
In a case where exiting a zone coincides with entering a local VTS zone, this report is not required. Procedures as local VTS zone reporting requirements shall be followed.
ECAREG reports shall be sent to:
  1. Halifax MCTS Centre. T: +1 (902) 426 4956. F: +1 (902) 426 4483. hlxecareg1@innav.gc.ca
  2. Les Escoumins MCTS Centre. T: +1 (418) 233 3483. F: +1 (418) 233 3299. ecareg.escoumins@innav.gc.ca
NORDREG:  With respect to the Northern Canada VTS zone (NORDREG), contact must be made with NORDREG CANADA 96 hours before entering Canadian waters, to meet Transport Canada Marine Security requirements, providing a Pre-Arrival Information Report. Further contact shall be made with ECAREG and NORDREG CANADA 24 hours before entering Canadian waters to obtain a clearance. The Northern Canada Vessel Traffic Services Zone Regulations apply to the following classes of vessels:
  1. vessels of 300 g.t. or more
  2. vessels that are engaged in towing or pushing another vessel, if the combined gross tonnage of the vessel and the vessel being towed or pushed is 500 g.t. or more
  3. vessels that are carrying as cargo, a pollutant or dangerous goods, or that are engaged in towing or pushing a vessel that is carrying as cargo a pollutant or dangerous goods.
Participation is mandatory.
NORDREG reports shall be addressed to NORDREG CANADA and communicated either directly to NORDREG CANADA or to the nearest CCG MCTS Centre. All times indicated in NORDREG reports shall be in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The Master of a ship shall ensure that these reports are made in accordance with the stated requirements.
The waters of Kugmallit Bay and MacKenzie Bay are considered part of the Northern Canada Vessel Traffic Services (NORDREG) zone. A final report must be submitted to NORDREG CANADA by vessels southbound in Kugmallit Bay to MacKenzie River at mile 1081, which is marked by Kittigauzit Bay Lightbuoy LL 1816 Mo(A) in position 69° 24.0′ N, 133° 38.0′ W. Vessels northbound from the MacKenzie River to Tuktoyatuk or the Beaufort Sea or northbound from Shallow Bay must submit a sailing plan report to NORDREG CANADA.
The information requested from the ships is derived from the standard reporting format shown in International Maritime Organization resolution A.851(20) – General Principles for Ship Reporting Systems and Ship Reporting Requirements, Including Guidelines for Reporting Incidents Involving Dangerous Goods, Harmful Substances and/or Marine Pollutants.
Every report shall begin with the term “NORDREG” (system identifier) and be followed by whichever of the following two letters corresponds to the report:
  1. SP, in the case of a sailing plan report
  2. PR, in the case of a position report
  3. FR, in the case of a final report
  4. DR, in the case of a deviation report.
The report must include the applicable designators followed by the information required in accordance with Table 3-1 – NORDREG Zone Report: Designators and Information Required available at www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/Marine-Communications/RAMN-2018/Part3#tab31
When a vessel is about to enter the NORDREG Zone, a sailing plan report (SP) shall be provided and must include the following SRS Items: A, B, C or D, E, F, G, H, I, L, O, P, Q, S, T, W, and X.
VTS Offshore:  With respect to the Western Canada VTS zones, the Vessel Traffic Services Zones Regulations require a report to be made at least 24 hours before the ship enters a VTS zone from seaward including Alaska, or as soon as possible where the estimated time of arrival at that VTS zone is less than 24 hours after the ship departs from the last port of call, where the ship is:
a) of 500 g.t. or more
b) engaged in towing or pushing a vessel, where the combined tonnage of the ship and the vessel being towed or pushed is 500 g.t. or more
c) carrying a pollutant or dangerous goods, or engaged in towing or pushing a vessel carrying a pollutant or dangerous goods as prescribed in the
i. International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code, and
ii. Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations.
Participation is mandatory.
The VTS Offshore report shall be communicated directly to Prince Rupert MCTS Centre or to the nearest CCG MCTS Centre. Dependent upon the reporting requirement, various elements of the following may be required to be reported:
a) name of ship
b) call sign
c) name of Master
d) position
e) time (UTC) the ship arrived at the position
f) course, if any
g) speed, if any
h) prevailing weather conditions (including ice if applicable)
I) ETA entering VTS zone (UTC)
j) name of the VTS zone the ship intends to enter
k) destination
l) ETA at destination (UTC)
m) intended route
n) last port of call
o) draft
p) any dangerous goods, listed by class, or pollutant, that is carried on board the ship or a vessel being towed or pushed by the ship
q) any defect in the ship's hull, main propulsion systems or steering systems, radars, compasses, radio equipment, anchors or cables
r) any discharge, or threat of discharge, of a pollutant from the ship into the water, and
s) any damage to the ship that may result in the discharge of a pollutant from the ship into the water
t) name of Canadian or United States agent of the ship
u) date of expiration of the following certificates:
i. Certificate of Insurance or Other Financial Security in Respect of Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage
ii. International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate
iii. International Pollution Prevention Certificate for the Carriage of Noxious Liquid Substances in Bulk
iv. Certificate of Fitness and the Certificate of Compliance, if any issued to the ship.
The following is also requested:
  1. the date and expiration of the ISM Safety Management Certificate:
  2. the ISM document of compliance; and
  3. the International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage, 2001 Certificate (known as Bunkers Convention Certificate), if any, issued to the ship.
Send the VTS Offshore Report to one of the following: vts.rupert@innav.gc.ca T: +1 (250) 627 3071 or via a Canadian Coast Guard MCTS Centre, free of charge.
BALLAST:  Ballast Water Exchange:  With the exception of vessels specifically exempted from the provision of Canada's Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations, all vessels are expected to exchange or treat their ballast before discharge in waters under Canadian jurisdiction.
When conducting ballast water exchange in order to meet the provisions of the Regulations, Part A of the IMO Guidelines for Ballast Water Management and Development of Ballast Water Management Plans and the IMO Guidelines for Ballast Water Exchange should be followed.
The Regulations specify the procedures that must be followed for vessels on transoceanic and non-transoceanic voyages, including the recognition that under certain circumstances, for reasons of safety, equipment failure or practicality, the preferred option for management of ballast water may not always be possible. In these cases, those alternatives that are acceptable have been identified, particular to specific voyages. Cases where exchanging ballast would be impractical, such as where the voyage was not of sufficient length in waters suitable for exchange, shall be considered exceptional circumstances and the authorities shall be notified.
In cases where the preferred option or alternatives are not complied with, the Master should be able to provide clear proof of why compliance was not possible.
Reporting Requirements:  If a ship is unable to manage its ballast water as required under section 4 of the Regulations, subsection 13(1) requires them to notify the Minister of Transport at least 96 hours before entry into the territorial sea of Canada. Where this is not possible because the ship is not aware that it is unable to manage its ballast water, notification should be made as soon as possible. Notification should be made to the appropriate MCTS centre and should provide the following information:
  1. an explanation as to the inability to carry out exchange, and
  2. what equivalent process the ship intends to carry out to minimise the threat of introduction of aquatic invasive species potentially entrained in the ballast water before entry into waters under Canadian jurisdiction.
For vessels proceeding to areas situated on the East Coast, in Quebec or in Ontario (Great Lakes Basin): Marine Communications and Traffic Services (ECAREG). T: +1 (902) 426 4956. F: +1 (902) 426 4483. Tlx: 019 22510.
For vessels proceeding to areas situated north of 60° N, including all the waters of Hudson Bay, Ungava Bay, and James Bay: Marine Communications and Traffic Services (NORDREG). T: +1 (867) 979 5724. F: +1 (867) 979 4236. Tlx: 063 15529.
For vessels proceeding to areas situated on the West Coast: Marine Communications and Traffic Services. T: +1 (604) 666 6011. F: +1 (604) 666 8453. offshore@rmic.gc.ca
Ballast Water Reporting Form:  As required by the regulations, the Master of a ship destined for a Canadian port, shall provide a fully completed Ballast Water Reporting Form. It is requested that whenever possible the form be submitted before entry into waters under Canadian jurisdiction. The Master of the ship shall provide the completed Ballast Water Reporting Form as follows:
  1. for vessels proceeding to areas situated on the East Coast, in Quebec or in Ontario (Great Lakes Basin): by Email to atlanticballastwater@tc.gc.ca , or by facsimile F: +1 (902) 426 6657
  2. for vessels proceeding to areas situated north of 60° N, including all the waters of Hudsons Bay, Ungava Bay, and James Bay: by email to atlanticballastwater@tc.gc.ca , or by facsimile F: +1 (902) 426 6657
  3. for vessels proceeding to areas situated on the West Coast: by email to pacballastwater@tc.gc.ca , or by facsimile F: +1 (604) 666 9177.
Vessels subject to the Regulations that have not submitted a fully completed form will be requested to provide the appropriate Marine Communication and Traffic Services Centre with the following information as part of the MCTS interrogative:
  1. whether a Ballast Water Reporting Form signed by the Master has been provided by facsimile to the appropriate agency (i.e. Transport Canada Marine Safety, port authorities or the US Coast Guard) or has been submitted by electronic or other acceptable means
  2. whether ballast water is being carried.
If the answer to (b) is affirmative:
  1. whether the vessel has a Ballast Water Management Plan appropriate to that vessel
  2. whether the Ballast Water Management Plan has been reviewed by a classification society or flag administration
  3. whether ballast water management procedures have been performed before entering Canada’s exclusive economic zone.
If the answer to (b) is negative:
  1. what is the reason for non-performance?
  2. what procedures are proposed to protect Canada’s waters before discharge of ballast?
Loaded Vessels with Tanks Containing Residual Ballast Water:  Loaded vessels coming from outside waters under Canadian jurisdiction normally carry some residual ballast water on board. Any vessel intending to take on ballast in tanks containing residual ballast water and subsequently discharge it in waters under Canadian jurisdiction, must ensure that proper management procedures have been followed.
Vessels must ensure that the residual ballast water has been exposed to salinity conditions equivalent to ballast exchange by complying with one of the following options:
  1. the residual ballast came from ballast that was properly exchanged at sea
  2. the residual ballast meets the international standard for treated ballast water
  3. the vessel complies with sections 1, 2, 6 and 7 of the Code of Best Practices for Ballast Water Management , published by the Shipping Federation of Canada
  4. the vessel conducted a saltwater flushing at least 200 n.m. from shore.
The vessel shall conduct mid-ocean ballast water exchange during ballast-laden voyages in an area 200 n.m. from any shore and in water 2,000 m. deep whenever possible, before entering waters under Canadian jurisdiction. Vessels unable to conduct mid-ocean ballast water exchange during ballast laden voyages shall conduct saltwater flushing of their empty ballast water tanks in an area 200 n.m. from any shore, whenever possible.
Saltwater flushing is defined as the addition of mid-ocean water to empty ballast water tanks; the mixing of the flush water with residual water and sediment through the motion of the vessel; and the discharge of the mixed water, such that the resultant residual water remaining in the tank has as high a salinity as possible, and preferably is greater than 30 parts per thousand. The vessel should take on as much mid-ocean water into each tank as is safe (for the vessel and crew) in order to conduct saltwater flushing. The Master of the vessel is responsible for ensuring the safety of the vessel, crew, and passengers. Vessels reporting only residual ballast water on board should take particular care to conduct saltwater flushing on the transit to the Great Lakes so as to eliminate fresh and or brackish water residuals in ballast tanks.
The St Lawrence Seaway Authorities' mandatory requirement contained in subsection 30(2) of the Seaway Practices and Procedures indicates that to obtain clearance to transit the Seaway every vessel entering the Seaway after operating beyond the exclusive economic zone must agree to comply with the Code of Best Practices for Ballast Water Management of the Shipping Federation of Canada.
Vessels unable to comply with section above, shall notify the Minister of Transport, who may, if found that the vessel did not comply with best management practices, in consultation with the Master, request that the any ballast water taken on board in the St Lawrence River or Great Lakes, be retained on board, treated on board or discharged to a reception facility and the vessel may be subject to inspection and detention if found to have detainable deficiencies.
Vessels that operate within the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River should comply with the Voluntary Management Practices to reduce the Transfer of Aquatic Nuisance Species Within the Great Lakes by U.S. ans Canadian Domestic Shipping of the Lake Carriers Association and the Canadian Shipowners Association while operating anywhere within the Great Lakes and the Seaway.
For full details contact Environmental Protection, Transport Canada, Tower C, 10th Floor, Place de Ville, Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0N8, Canada. T: +1 (613) 991 3135. F: +1 (613) 993 8196. marinesafety-securitemaritime@tc.gc.ca
POLLUTION:  Environmental Response Systems (Government of Canada) is responsible for developing and administering policies, regulations and programs to protect the marine environment, to mitigate the impact on the environment of marine pollution incidents in Canadian waters, and to ensure the safety of the general public. It works with other federal agencies and departments, such as Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard and Environmental and Climate Change Canada (ECCC).
The Canadian Coast Guard leads the response to ship-source oil spills in Canadian waters, including the Arctic. It works with Transport Canada, ECCC, response organisations (see below) and other agencies to reduce pollution from ships. Polluters are liable for paying for spills from their vessels.
Vessel operators must have oil pollution emergency plans on board. Vessels travelling south of 60 degrees north latitude must also have a contract with an oil spill response company (response organisation) certified by Transport Canada.
In the event of an environmental emergency, call the 24-hour telephone number below for the province or territory in which the event occurred. In turn, these authorities will inform Environment and Climate Change Canada of the emergency event.
Contact Tel: +1
Alberta: 
Alberta Ministry of Environment and Parks (780) 422 4505
British Columbia: 
Emergency Management British Columbia, Ministry of Justice 800 663 3456
Manitoba: 
Manitoba Ministry of Sustainable Development (204) 944 4888
New Brunswick: 
Maritimes Regional Office, Canadian Coast Guard, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (902) 426 6030
Newfoundland & Labrador: 
Newfoundland and Labrador Regional Office, Canadian Coast Guard, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (709) 772 2083
Northwest Territories: 
Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Government of the Northwest Territories (867) 920 8130
Nova Scotia: 
Maritimes Regional Office, Canadian Coast Guard, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (902) 426 6030
Nunavut: 
Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Government of the Northwest Territories (867) 920 8130
Ontario: 
Spills Action Centre, Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (416) 325 3000
Prince Edward Island: 
Maritimes Regional Office, Canadian Coast Guard, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (902) 426 6030
Quebec: 
National Environmental Emergencies Centre, Environment and Climate Change Canada (514) 283 2333
Saskatchewan: 
Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment 800 667 7525
Yukon: 
Yukon Department of Environment (867) 667 7244
Response Organisation:  Vessels that transit Canadian waters are required to have a shipboard oil pollution emergency plan, as well as an arrangement with a certified response organisation that would respond to a spill on the polluter's behalf. Response organisations are certified every three years by Transport Canada. In addition, oil handling facilities, or anyone who loads and unloads oil and oil products, are required to have an oil pollution emergency plan, as well as response equipment on site during the transfer.
In Canada, there are four certified response agencies.
  1. Atlantic Emergency Response Team (ALERT). 350 Bayside Drive, Saint John, NB, E2J 4Y8. T: +1 (506) 202 4499.
  2. Eastern Canada Response Corporation Ltd. 1201 - 275 Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario. T: +1 (613) 230 7369. F: +1 (613) 230 7344. www.ecrc.ca
  3. Western Canada Marine Response Corporation. 206-3500 Gilmore Way, Burnaby, BC, V5G 0B8. T: +1 (604) 294 6001. www.wcmrc.com
  4. Point Tupper Marine Services Ltd. (PTMS). Point Tupper, Point Tuppers, NS, B9A 1Z5. T: +1 (902) 625 1711.
Arctic Pollution Prevention Certificate:  The Canadian authorities have terminated their requirement for an Arctic Pollution Prevention Certificate and adopted the Polar Code as from December 2017. Compliance with the Polar Code is therefore required for entry into Canadian polar waters.
The Polar Code Certificate is not yet required for all ships. This is because compliance with the Polar Code for ships constructed before 1 January 2017 is not required until first intermediate or renewal survey after 1 January 2018. For ships not yet required to be provided with the Polar Code Certificate, no document of compliance will be required for entry into Canadian polar waters until the ships are required to comply with the Polar Code.
The Canadian authorities have not changed their restrictions with respect to Ice Class in Safety Control Zones, and these restrictions still apply to all ships.
LOCAL HOLIDAYS:  1 January (New Year's Day); Good Friday; Easter Monday; Victoria Day; Canada Day; Labour Day; 2nd Monday in October (Thanksgiving Day); 11 November (Remembrance Day); Christmas Day; Boxing Day.
WEATHER/TIDES:  Present and forecast weather conditions are available online at www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/canada_e.html
For detailed information on present and predicted ice conditions, view www.ice-glaces.ec.ga.ca
CONSULS:  Contact details of foreign representatives can be found on the Global Affairs Canada website at www.international.gc.ca
CUSTOMS:  Reporting of Ships Stores:  Reference should be made to Memorandum D4-2-1, Ship’s Stores. www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/dm-md/d4/d4-2-1-eng.html
  1. The Form E1, Ship's Stores Declaration, properly certified, and the Crew Effects Declaration, Form BSF552, or their counterpart on the documentation of another country, shall be filed with Customs. Such forms shall be submitted in triplicate in English or French each time a ship engaged in international trade reports inward from a foreign country. While Customs will not always board a vessel at time of arrival, a ship's compliance with Customs laws may be verified at any time.
  2. The original of Form E1  and Form BSF552  is filed with the inward report of the ship; the second and third copies are left with the Master. When stores are issued or additional stores delivered, a notation to this effect is made on the reverse side of the second and third copies of the Form E1  held by the Master. These copies remain with the Master until the ship clears directly for a foreign port, at which time the second copies of both forms shall be submitted to Customs and filed with the outward report.
  3. When a ship reporting inward has no cargo, the inward report shall clearly state whether the ship is in ballast or in ballast with ships' stores.
  4. Customs shall permit Agents a period of 24 hours from the time the outward report is filed in which to present the duplicate copies of Form E1  and Form BFS552.
Ship Stores Declaration, Form E1:  Form E1, completed in triplicate, is used to list ships' stores. A boarding CBSA officer may examine form E1 for completeness. Any quantity of stores not allowed for consumption while in port will be placed in a secure area. Sealing may be required. When ships' stores are delivered to a ship, the quantities and the seal numbers, if applicable, are recorded on the reverse side of Form E1. Similarly, when issues are made, the quantities issued are recorded on the reverse of Form E1.
A reasonable quantity of liquor and tobacco products may be left unsecured or unsealed for the personal use of the Master or senior ship’s officers. These quantities are to be recorded on Form E1. A reasonable quantity is defined in the Ship’s Stores Regulations. laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/sor-96-40/FullText.html
Goods for sale or distribution to members of the crew and not to be landed shall be secured or sealed in the same manner as ships' stores and remain secured or sealed until the ship clears for a foreign destination. These goods shall be listed on a separate sheet in triplicate by the Master or other authorised ship's officer and the sheet attached to Form E1. The location of the goods shall be noted on Form E1.
Duty paid goods may be delivered as ships' stores may be eligible for a refund or drawback under the provisions of Memorandum D7-4-2, Duty Drawback Program. www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/dm-md/d7/d7-4-2-eng.html When such stores are delivered to a ship, a copy of Form K36A, Ships Stores Declaration and Clearance Certificate, is retained by the Master and filed with Form E1 and Form BSF552.
Occasionally, foreign ships may carry animals as a supply of fresh meat; these animals shall be listed on Form E1. These animals shall not be removed from the ship while in Canada.
Crew's Effects Declaration, Form BSF552:  Form BSF552, completed in triplicate, is used to show quantities of tobacco products and alcoholic beverages in possession of officers and crew as well as non-duty paid items such as televisions, radios, cameras, pets, etc. While such items may be kept in possession of the crew members, quantities of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products exceeding the quantity limitations set out in Memorandum D2-1-1, Temporary Importation of Baggage and Conveyances by Non-residents www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/dm-md/d2/d2-1-1-eng.html shall be secured or sealed.
Pets belonging to crew members shall be listed by species on Form BSF552 opposite the name of the individual owner. These pets shall not be removed from the ship while in Canada.
A crew member may bring personal items ashore without producing evidence that each article is duty paid, but a check of these articles may be conducted prior to the departure of the ship to ensure their exportation. Items declared on Form BSF552 which are subsequently duty paid are deleted from the list, and the date and number of the relevant accounting document (Form B15, Casual Goods Accounting Document) are noted on Form BSF552.
When crew members sign off a ship in a Canadian port, any goods in their possession are subject to accounting in the normal manner. Returning Canadians may claim residents' or returning former residents' privileges and foreign crew members may apply for either temporary importation or settler's effects privileges. For additional information on Settler's effects, please consult Memorandum D2-2-1, Settlers’ Effects – Tariff Item No. 9807.00.00 www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/dm-md/d2/d2-2-1-eng.html
Delivery and Issuance of Ships' Stores:  At CBSA offices not operating on a shift schedule, CBSA approval for the delivery of ships' stores is restricted to the period of the regular office hours of the port. In unforeseen circumstances CBSA may, upon written application, authorise the delivery or issuance of ships' stores beyond these hours subject to the provisions of Memorandum D1-2-1, Special Services www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/dm-md/d1/d1-2-1-eng.html
The attendance of a CBSA officer may be required when cigarettes, cigars, tobacco, wine, spirits and narcotics are laden on board a ship as ships' stores. It is the responsibility of the vendor, chandler, or transportation company to make any necessary arrangements with CBSA in order to have the services of a CBSA officer approve delivery, and to verify the quantities, sign the accounting document and place the goods under seal, if required. These arrangements should be made no less than 24 hours before the service is required.
Normally, narcotics as medical stores are held in the ship's safe under the direct control of the Master or ship's doctor. The quantity of narcotics and the location of the safe must be noted on Form E1.
The Master or other authorised ship's officer may release a reasonable quantity of tobacco products and spirits for the immediate use of the officers and crew. The quantities issued shall be listed on Form E1. Normally, such issues are made on a weekly basis.
Supplies of wine used as a table beverage need not be secured or placed under seal. Form E1 shall indicate the quantity of such wine on board and the location of the bottles, storage tanks or barrels.
Supplies of beer and ale need not be secured or placed under seal when the ship is departing on a foreign voyage directly from the port of lading. When a ship is to call at another Canadian port on the outward voyage, only 8.2 litres (288 ounces) for each crew member may remain unsecured or unsealed. Appropriate notations should be made on Form E1, to indicate the quantities laden on board and the portion left unsecured or unsealed.
The declaration and receipt forms on the reverse side of the, Form B60, Excise Duty Entry, shall be properly completed when excisable goods are delivered as ships' stores.
Ships' stores paint may be released to a ship's crew or, in the case of a drydocked ship, to the shipyard for painting of the ship. The quantity of paint released shall be noted on Form E1 as it is removed for use.
International Waters:  Any ship carrying secured ships' stores or stores under seal and sailing from one Canadian port to another may issue stores in international waters, provided the ship is not participating in the coasting trade of Canada. Under international treaty, the Great Lakes, excluding tributary waters, are international waters.
When a ship intends to call at a non-CBSA port after reporting outward, a reasonable quantity of stores may be issued for the period preceding the actual departure from the non-CBSA port. Remaining ships' stores shall be secured or sealed.
Stores may be checked at each port of call of a ship engaged in international trade.
AUTHORITY:  Pacific Regional Office:  Transport Canada, Pacific Region, 820 - 800 Burrard Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6Z 2J8, Canada. T: +1 (604) 666 5369. www.tc.gc.ca/en/services/marine/ports-harbours/list-canada-port-authorities.html Contact: Operations Manager - Programs.
Prairie and Northern Region:  Transport Canada, Prairie & Northern Region, Marine Safety & Security Services, 1100 - 9970 Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T5J 4E6, Canada. T: +1 (780) 495 3810. F: +1 (780) 495 4748. pnrweb@tc.gc.ca www.tc.gc.ca Contact: Operations Manager. T: +1 (780) 495 4023. F: +1 (780) 495 6472.
Ontario Region Headquarters:  Transport Canada, Ontario Region, Ports & Harbours Division, 4900 Yonge Street, North York, Ontario M2N 6A5, Canada. T: +1 (416) 952 0490. www.tc.gc.ca/en/services/marine/ports-harbours/list-ports-owned-transport.html Contact: Operations Manager - Programs.
Quebec Region Headquarters:  Transport Canada, Quebec Region, Ports & Harbours Division, 401-1550, Avenue d'Estimanville, Quebec, Quebec G1J 0C8, Canada. T: +1 (418) 648 4101. www.tc.gc.ca/en/services/marine/ports-harbours/list-ports-owned-transport Contact: Operations Manager - Programs.
Atlantic Region Office (Newfoundland & Labrador):  Transport Canada, Atlantic Region, Ports & Harbours Division, 95 Foundry Street, PO Box 42, Moncton, New Brunswick E14C 8K6, Canada. T: +1 (506) 851 6094. www.tc.gc.ca/en/services/marine Contact: Operations Manager - Programs.